Future 5G and Wi-Fi opportunities will be driven by private networks

An increase in private 5G network deployments has been underway for nearly two years now, and a study by RAN Research, the wireless forecasting arm of Rethink Technology Research, predicts that private network adoption will accelerate at a higher than public 5G, peaking around 2028 in most markets.

The Private networks generate opportunities in 5G and Wi-Fi One study noted that this peak would come about two years earlier in China and some time later in developing regions of Africa and Latin America. Looking at what this could mean in terms of business, the study calculated that by 2028, sales of private 5G networks and associated services such as installation would generate $23.8 billion, before leveling off. in 2029 and then taper off as they reach saturation, with new deployments being mostly upgrades and expansions.

The forecast looked at what it believed to be key private network regions and industry verticals, identifying manufacturing followed by healthcare as the key drivers of private 5G enterprise early on, but with strong growth to come. all levels and other areas catching up to varying degrees later. While RAN Research expected manufacturing to account for 19% of all deployments by number of installed cells in 2022, followed by healthcare at 11%, the respective figures for 2029 are expected to be 12% and 8%.

However, the analyst noted that manufacturing and healthcare would still account for a large portion of the cumulative private 5G deployments over the entire 2022 to 2029 forecast period, respectively 4.63 million and three million cells over a worldwide total of 35.8 million. This global total is 19 times the 2022 total of 1.89 million, with a similar rate of increase for revenue. The 2021 total was just 689,000, meaning deployments have almost tripled over the past year, driven in particular by the US, China, Japan and Germany, followed by other major industrial countries such as the United Kingdom, France and South Korea.

The analyst issued a note of regional caution, noting that China appeared likely to be crippled by regulatory resistance to private 5G, with rollout dominated by the three state monopolies, China Mobile, China Telecom and China Unicom. . However, RAN Research pointed out that a strong upsurge in the country’s enterprises, including government agencies as well as manufacturers, has opened up the country’s enterprise 5G domain to rapid growth, although large operators are benefiting from more great involvement in major projects.

In addition to a resumption of 5G-based private networks, the study predicts a similar increase in the deployment of enterprise Wi-Fi networks around the current 6E standard, offering greater capacity and performance than the previous generation, closer to 5G. RAN Research said Wi-Fi growth would be strongest in North America and Europe, peaking earlier in 2024, after which an increasing number of sites would upgrade to 5G for more demanding use cases.

The analysis also observed that the big difference with 5G is that Wi-Fi deployments will steadily decline after 2024, an important factor being that Chinese companies are largely abandoning the technology in favor of 5G. It also projects Wi-Fi deployment revenue to grow from $751 million in 2022 to $2.51 billion in 2025, a rate similar to the growth rate of private 5G, but then decline year on year. to reach $1.7 billion in 2029.

While it said 5G would account for the lion’s share of growth over the entire forecast period, RAN Research predicted that a significant number of private 4G networks would still be rolled out over the next few years. Similarly, on the Wi-Fi front, Gen 5 is currently dominant, but the study predicts that it will be the last 6E to take over during the forecast period, followed by Wi-Fi 7 after 2024. offering an alternative to 5G for some. less demanding emergent cases.

In conclusion, RAN Research said that private 5G networks are attracting new players into the mobile arena. Operators face competition not only from new service providers, but also from the companies themselves who bypass them to build their own networks.

An increase in private 5G network deployments has been underway for nearly two years now, and a study by RAN Research, the wireless forecasting arm of Rethink Technology Research, predicts that private network adoption will accelerate at a higher than public 5G, peaking around 2028 in most markets.

The Private networks generate opportunities in 5G and Wi-Fi One study noted that this peak would come about two years earlier in China and some time later in developing regions of Africa and Latin America. Looking at what this could mean in terms of business, the study calculated that by 2028, sales of private 5G networks and associated services such as installation would generate $23.8 billion, before leveling off. in 2029 and then taper off as they reach saturation, with new deployments being mostly upgrades and expansions.

The forecast looked at what it believed to be key private network regions and industry verticals, identifying manufacturing followed by healthcare as the key drivers of private 5G enterprise early on, but with strong growth to come. all levels and other areas catching up to varying degrees later. While RAN Research expected manufacturing to account for 19% of all deployments by number of installed cells in 2022, followed by healthcare at 11%, the respective figures for 2029 are expected to be 12% and 8%.

However, the analyst noted that manufacturing and healthcare would still account for a large portion of the cumulative private 5G deployments over the entire 2022 to 2029 forecast period, respectively 4.63 million and three million cells over a worldwide total of 35.8 million. This global total is 19 times the 2022 total of 1.89 million, with a similar rate of increase for revenue. The 2021 total was just 689,000, meaning deployments have almost tripled over the past year, driven in particular by the US, China, Japan and Germany, followed by other major industrial countries such as the United Kingdom, France and South Korea.

The analyst issued a note of regional caution, noting that China appeared likely to be crippled by regulatory resistance to private 5G, with rollout dominated by the three state monopolies, China Mobile, China Telecom and China Unicom. . However, RAN Research pointed out that a strong upsurge in the country’s enterprises, including government agencies as well as manufacturers, has opened up the country’s enterprise 5G domain to rapid growth, although large operators are benefiting from more great involvement in major projects.

In addition to a resumption of 5G-based private networks, the study predicts a similar increase in the deployment of enterprise Wi-Fi networks around the current 6E standard, offering greater capacity and performance than the previous generation, closer to 5G. RAN Research said Wi-Fi growth would be strongest in North America and Europe, peaking earlier in 2024, after which an increasing number of sites would upgrade to 5G for more demanding use cases.

The analysis also observed that the big difference with 5G is that Wi-Fi deployments will steadily decline after 2024, an important factor being that Chinese companies are largely abandoning the technology in favor of 5G. It also projects Wi-Fi deployment revenue to grow from $751 million in 2022 to $2.51 billion in 2025, a rate similar to the growth rate of private 5G, but then decline year on year. to reach $1.7 billion in 2029.

While it said 5G would account for the lion’s share of growth over the entire forecast period, RAN Research predicted that a significant number of private 4G networks would still be rolled out over the next few years. Similarly, on the Wi-Fi front, Gen 5 is currently dominant, but the study predicts that it will be the last 6E to take over during the forecast period, followed by Wi-Fi 7 after 2024. offering an alternative to 5G for some. less demanding emergent cases.

In conclusion, RAN Research said that private 5G networks are attracting new players into the mobile arena. Operators face competition not only from new service providers, but also from the companies themselves who bypass them to build their own networks.